Children’s Health

Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) encounters related to physical abuse decreased by 19 percent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a multicenter study published in the journal Pediatrics. While encounter rates with lower clinical severity dropped during the pandemic, encounter rates with higher clinical severity remained unchanged. This pattern raises concern for unrecognized harm, as opposed
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UBC researchers demonstrated in 2019 that pre-schoolers can safely overcome peanut allergies with a treatment called oral immunotherapy. Now they have evidence that the earlier pre-schoolers start this treatment, the better. This real-world study focused on infants younger than 12 months old and reveals that not only is oral immunotherapy effective against peanut allergies, it’s
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Surface sampling for SARS-CoV-2 RNA has shown promise to detect the exposure of environments to infected individuals shedding the virus who would not otherwise be detected. Now a new study, published in mSystems, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, shows that the methodology used to detect COVID-19 in nasal swabs at
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In a recent study published in the Jama Network Open journal, researchers investigated the impact of in utero exposure to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the neurodevelopment of infants. It is still unclear if a mother’s severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection affects her offspring’s neurodevelopment. However, the robust immune activation observed in
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In a recent article posted to the medRxiv* preprint server, scientists assessed the efficacy of the primary and boosted regimens of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccinations in preventing SARS-CoV-2 Omicron-linked hospitalizations in the United States (US). ​​​​​​​Study: Vaccine Effectiveness of Primary Series and Booster Doses against Omicron Variant COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization in the
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Determining how SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19, moves from an early stage of infection, when patients are largely asymptomatic, into a later stage when people may experience life-threatening inflammation in the lungs, is a critical step in understanding how to target and treat the disease more efficiently. But that transition process is complex and cannot
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Eating disorders are often misunderstood as lifestyle choices gone awry or oversimplified as the unfortunate result of societal pressures. These misconceptions obscure the fact that eating disorders are serious and potentially fatal mental illnesses that can be treated effectively with early intervention. Mortality rates for people with eating disorders are high compared to other mental
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Diet-related chronic diseases are now considered a global pandemic. Thus, promoting better health amongst populations necessitates curtailing faulty and deleterious dietary patterns and evidence-based recommendations. The human gut microbiota plays a crucial part in modulating chronic diseases and the expression of the physiological effects of diet. A recent Cell Host & Microbe study discusses the
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A study published in JAMA Pediatrics shows how frequently childcare insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic occurred and the effect it had on parental job loss. Employment disruptions due to childcare insecurity existed before the pandemic began, especially for parents of children with special medical needs. But shutdowns and other measures taken to prevent the spread
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Does dose reduction for patients on stable opioid therapy have long-term overdose and mental health risks? Researchers from the UC Davis Center for Healthcare Policy and Research examined the potential long-term risks of opioid dose tapering. They found that patients on stable but higher-dose opioid therapy who had their doses tapered by at least 15%
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Several months ago, a lab technologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital mixed the blood components of two people: Alphonso Harried, who needed a kidney, and Pat Holterman-Hommes, who hoped to give him one. The goal was to see whether Harried’s body would instantly see Holterman-Hommes’ organ as a major threat and attack it before surgeons could finish
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