Month: June 2021

Younger patients, including adolescents, are less likely to suffer severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms. This is the case even though the risk of infection with its causative pathogen – the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) – is not necessarily reduced in this age group. This has led to the supposition that stronger
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects about 7% of children, with a two out of three chance of persisting into adulthood. This neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by concentration difficulties, increased distractibility, impulsivity and hyperactivity. Today, ADHD is treated with pharmaceutical drugs that may have unwanted side effects. This is why scientists from the University of
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Ten IU School of Medicine researchers out of a team of 11 scientists, are responsible for the findings of a new study they conducted to investigate alternative ways to treat kidney infections. Their work, which is published in the high-quality research journal Nature Communications, examined how to utilize the kidneys’ own internal infection fighting capabilities
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“No more walking!” my three-year-old screamed during his first hike without a carrier. We weren’t even halfway. Remembering the bubbles in my backpack, we decided to end with a smile instead of completing the hike at all costs.  My husband and I have guided paddling, dogsled and backpacking trips over the years—but adventuring with our
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When being short is normal Take a peek into a preschool class and you’ll see a wide range of heights, but chances are, most children are perfectly within normal range. “When you look at a growth curve, the 50th percentile means if you have 100 kids, 50 kids would be taller than that line and
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International organizations and countries around the world are working to eliminate HIV/AIDS by 2030. To reach this goal, new approaches are needed–particularly among difficult-to-reach groups such as people who inject drugs (PWID), who are 30 times more likely to contract HIV/AIDS compared with the general population. Matthew Akiyama, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Albert
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Middle ear infections, also known as otitis media, affect more than 80% of the children in the U.S. In a new study, researchers have designed a miniaturized 3D-printed device to inactivate Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common bacterium that causes the infection. The device–a microplasma jet array–generates plasma, which is composed of charged particles and reactive molecules
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It was a nagging mystery: A rare-disease expert at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh had found a successful treatment for two of the deadliest symptoms of one of the more common classes of rare diseases diagnosed by newborn screenings, but one symptom–painful episodes of muscle breakdown that land victims in intensive care–persisted. Today, the scientists
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A gene variant that lowers white blood cell levels and is common in individuals with African ancestry contributes to unnecessary bone marrow biopsies, according to a study published June 28 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The findings from three institutions, led by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, provide an example of how using genetic data
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Making the most out of the summer months when you’re pregnant is important. After all, pregnancy is hard enough as it is, you deserve time to treat yourself! Now that the season is officially in swing, here is how you can practice pregnancy self care of yourself and stay healthy all summer long. 1. Take
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Here are four ways to keep their skin shielded from the sun’s harmful rays. Warmer weather means we’ll be spending more time outside—and it’s very important to make sure your kid’s skin is protected. Not only are sunburns uncomfortable (and in some cases, downright painful) but getting sunburned increases your kid’s risk for developing skin
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